Monthly Archives: April 2011

CAN Aotearoa’s April Newsletter, Part 2

Kia ora koutou,

Following on from our email yesterday, please find Part 2 of our newsletter below.

Alert: Police set to raid Te Whanau a Apanui
Rumours that the police have plans to raid Te Whanau a Apanui have been circulating today.
See, for example, http://news.tangatawhenua.com/archives/11539
This community is on the front lines of the fight for climate justice, trying to protect their ancestral waters from deep sea oil drilling.
Coal Action Network Aotearoa is deeply concerned about this rumour of raids and send our solidarity to Te Whanau a Apanui.  Please do what you can to pass the word on.  (Te Whanau a Apanui have put out a callout to get the word out to people about the possible raid in the hope that exposing it prevents it).

Lyttelton Port Company and the February Christchurch Earthquake

In 2009, the Lyttelton Port Company applied for consentsfor reclamation as part of an eastwards expansion to increase capacity to export coal. CAN Aotearoa is opposed to this expansion, as it will greatly increase the ability of coal mining companies to extract and export West Coast coal. The consent application is yet to be heard, but in the weeks following the earthquake it emerged that the Port Company had been dumping ‘rubble’ from Christchurch into the harbour. The national controller had given permission for the Port to dump rubble from the Port Hills that was impinging the operation of the Port but not from the city. Read more: http://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/news/christchurch-earthquake-2011/4839894/Stop-rubble-fill-work-port-ordered

Trans-Pacific Partnership, Climate Change, and Upcoming NZ Not for Sale meetings

The Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP), now in secret negotiations, is a proposed ‘Free Trade Agreement’ (FTA) that extends the existing agreement between Chile, Singapore, Brunei and New Zealand, adding the USA, Australia, Peru, Malaysia and Vietnam. The TPP would give special privileges to foreign investors (mostly global corporations) by limiting certain types of laws and government practices which elected parliaments might otherwise enact in the interests of their people.

For example, the TPP contains ‘investor rights’ provisions, whereby companies from the signatory countries can sue the governments of those counties if the companies feel that they are the victim of ‘expropriation’ or ‘discrimination.’ Under NAFTA (a similar, and notorious, free trade agreement), governments have paid US$326 million in compensation to investors, who sued over the rejection of a toxic waste dump, a health levy on tobacco, plain packaging of cigarettes, a ban on gasoline additives and much more.

In another example, any Chinese investor that invests in Southland lignite can claim a legitimate expectation that the Emission Trading Scheme rules (and subsidies) will continue unless the government points out the possibility of change – and that’s under the current free trade regime. So we can only expect it would get worse.

The TPP is a way for big capital to get around environmental and labour laws to increase their profits, at our expense.

If you are want to get involved in the campaign against TPP, check out http://tppwatch.org/ or http://www.nznotforsale.org/

Murray Horton’s NZ Not for Sale speaking tour

Murray Horton from NZ Not for Sale + Campaign Against Foreign Control of Aotearoa is about to embark on a South Island speaking tour. (He has just done the North Island). His talk covers a range of issues, including the Trans-Pacific Partnership, privatisation of public assets (and we know Solid Energy is on this list), transnational corporate takeover of NZ and how people can fight back – all topics of great interest to the CAN Aotearoa organising group, and, we hope, you too.

Meeting schedule here: http://cafcatour.blogspot.com/

Dunedin

Thursday May 12th, 12 noon, Burns 1 Lecture Theatre, Otago University

Second meeting, 7pm, Alexander MacMillan Room, Community House, Lower Moray Place

Blenheim

Monday May 30th, 7pm, Wesley Centre Lounge, 3 Henry St.

Nelson

Tuesday May 31st, 7:30pm, Victory Community Centre, Totara St

Takaka

Wednesday June 1st, 7:30pm, Senior Citizens Hall, 94 Commercial St

Check inspectors in mines

The Labour History Project Newsletter 51, April 2011, includes an article on ‘Workplace Health and Safety laws in New Zealand: for whose benefit? ‘ by Ross Wilson (pp. 6-11). He writes, ‘[In] the mining industry…, from the passing of the 1908 Coal Mines Act until 1993, workers had the right to elect their own “check inspectors” who undertook mine inspections.’ This was lost in the 1992 Health and Safety in Employment Act.

Wilson continues, ‘Overall, the Government policy reflected in the Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992 was an almost total rejection of the participatory approach promoted by the CTU, and an almost complete adoption of the Employers’ Federation “the employer knows best” agenda. In effect, our legislation was like a two-legged stool. The employers had a clear general duty, and the inspectorate had a clear enforcement role, but employees and their unions were denied the statutory role which has been such an important feature of the modern European and Australian models.’

CAN Aotearoa supports the call for a return of check inspectors, following the tragic loss of workers’ lives at Pike River.

The Labour History Project Newsletter is well worth a read when it goes up online at: http://www.lhp.org.nz/LHP/Newsletters.html

Coal Action Network Aotearoa bank account
We’ve just opened a bank account, so if you want to donate towards our work, you can do so:
Coal Action Network
Kiwibank
38 9011 0484435 00

At this stage our expenses are mostly printing and venue hire.  But as we gear up, so will our costs.  Many thanks!


Kind regards
Frances Mountier
for the Coal Action Network Aotearoa

Coal Action Network Aotearoa (CAN Aotearoa) is a group of climate justice campaigners committed to fighting the continuation of coal mining in Aotearoa New Zealand.

CAN Aotearoa’s objectives are to:
1. Phase out coal mining and coal usage within 20 years, initially by opposing new and expanded coal mines.
2. Promote a cultural change so that mining and using coal are unacceptable.
3. Work towards a society where people and the environment are not exploited for profit.
4. Be part of a just transition to a coal-free Aotearoa New Zealand.

Or join the CAN Aotearoa supporters list by emailing: coalactionnetwork[at]gmail.com

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CAN Aotearoa’s April Newsletter, Part 1

Kia ora koutou,

We have a lot of news this month, so we have split this newsletter into two parts. Look out for Part 2 tomorrow.

If you would like to join our announcement list and receive this newsletter by mail, please email coalactionnetwork[at]gmail.com with “Mailing list” in the subject line.

Now for some news:

James Hansen Visit in May

The campaign against lignite mining in Southland will get a major boost with the visit of leading climate scientist Dr James Hansen. He is visiting Aotearoa from 11-21 May and will be involved in a range of events throughout the country. Here is the tour announcement that Jeanette Fitzsimons has just sent out:

“World famous climate scientist Dr James Hansen arrives soon for a speaking tour in NZ, brought by a coalition of environmental and social justice organisations, academics and progressive business. If you’ve been puzzled about the controversies about climate change, this is your chance to get it straight. If you are already convinced and want to know what must be done, Be there. We can now bring you the schedule for public meetings in NZ. There is more detail on the facebook site
http://www.facebook.com/home.php?ref=home#!/pages/James-Hansen-NZ-Tour-May-2011/176696445713765

His public talks are called “Human-made climate change: a scientific, moral and legal issue” and he explains the latest science of climate change, how serious and urgent action has become, and why he has become an activist as well as a scientist. This could be a turning point in NZ’s awareness and in the public demand for government action. He is meeting with progressive business leaders, politicians, farmers, youth and media – I hope as many as possible of civil society will meet him too as we are the only ones who can make the difference in the end.

We are not taking out paid advertising, but relying on e-lists and word of mouth.

We are operating on a shoestring – if you would like to donate to the costs of the tour,  Oxfam is acting as banker for us. The account is 01 0202 0117805 02 Please use the reference ADCLIMATETOUR11_JHT

Schedule of public events for Dr James Hansen’s NZ Tour, May 2011

Thurs 12th May: Auckland

6pm:   public lecture University of Auckland Business School OGGB4, Level 0, Owen Glenn Bldg, 12 Grafton Rd

Fri 13th May: Palmerston North

1.30pm public lecture, Japan Room,  Massey University

Sat 14th May

8.15 am RNZ with Kim Hill

Mon 16th May: Wellington

5.45pm public lecture Rutherford House, welcomed by Mayor Celia Wade-Brown

Tues 17th May: Wellington

8.45 am – 5.30 pm IPS Symposium “Future of Coal,” Victoria University

(he will speak 10.20 to 11.30,  on panel 4pm -5.30pm). (Note: You need to register for this event by emailing ips[at]vuw.ac.nz)

Download programme (PDF)

Wed 18th May:  Dunedin

5.30 – 7pm public lecture, St David’s Lecture Hall

Thurs 19th May:  Gore

2 pm public meeting hosted by Mataura Landcare group , Gore District Council Bldg

Friday 20th May: Christchurch

12-1 pm Uni of Canterbury, room tbc

5.30 pm public talk hosted by Kennedy Graham, MP, venue TBC

Saturday 21st May: Auckland

12-4 pm, Auckland Town Hall, Festival for the Planet – music, talks, dance, action event especially for young people with a Pasifika flavour. Hansen speaks 2.30 pm. More at www.planetfestival.org.nz
CAN Aotearoa will have a presence at each public meeting. We’ll see you there!

Two successful “Keep the Coal in the Hole” public meetings with Jeanette Fitzsimons

Jeanette Fitzsimons spoke at “Keep The Coal In the Hole” public meetings in Invercargill on 19 April and in Dunedin on 20 April – and both meetings went very well.

Jenny Campbell reports from the Invercargill public meeting:

“Jeanette Fitzsimons’ passion, knowledge of relevant facts and calm manner came across strongly at the Invercargill meeting organised by Southland Forest and Bird along with CAN Aotearoa. Nearly 40 people including a strong press contingent came to listen, interview and report. This produced some good coverage in Southland Times and Gore’s community newspaper Newslink, along with CUE TV local news.

“People’s questions covered concerns about employment, social effects, air pollution, water pollution, loss of habitat and farming land. People from local coal mining towns talked about the health issues they are facing now. Having a series of articles in the local newspapers along with letters to the Editor is proving very helpful as people realise it is not just an issue about jobs.”
In Dunedin, about 120 people attended Jeanette’s public meeting on 20 April – the biggest audience of the four meetings we’ve held to date. There was a strong media presence, and Jeanette did plenty of interviews while she was in Dunedin. Over half those present signed up for the CAN Aotearoa supporters’ list – and that doesn’t include those who were on the list already. This was a strong finish to this phase of Jeanette’s tour, and a good lead-in to the James Hansen tour.

As Jenny says, the informal networking that happened after both meetings is just as vital, as people get together to inform and support each other in what may be a long struggle.

Solid Energy Pilot Briquetting Plant – Resource Consent Notification Status

No change! Gore District Council and Environment Southland still haven’t made a decision about whether they will notify the resource consent application for Solid Energy’s planned pilot briquetting plant. It seems that the whole process is not going quite as smoothly for Solid Energy as they had hoped…

If the application is notified, we’ll let you know what you can do to help oppose consent being granted.

20thApril Global Day of Action Against Extraction

Last Wednesday was one year on from the Gulf Oil spill, with its catastrophic and ongoing social, environmental and climatic consequences. The Global Day of Action Against Extraction was a great success with events in Taranaki, Wellington, Dunedin, Whanganui, Nelson, Auckland, the East Cape and more. In Wellington, there was an all day event at Civic Square, and a march to the Brazillian Embassy, led by Te Whanau a Apanui and Ngati Porou, against deep sea oil drilling off the East Coast. Check out the reports and photos from around the country at: http://www.indymedia.org.nz/article/79556/protests-across-aotearoa-mark-anniversar
Stop Deep Sea Oil Campaign Action Alert

Act now: Iwi fishing skipper detained on navy warship

What happened on 23 April

Elvis Teddy, skipper of the Te Whanau a Apanui tribal fishing boat San Pietro, was arrested at sea and detained on a navy warship while fishing in Te Whanau a Apanui customary fishing grounds in the vicinity of the Orient Explorer, the deep sea oil survey ship ship currently conducting seismic testing in the Raukumara Basin on behalf of Brazilian oil company Petrobras. The arrest came the day after Maritime NZ withdrew the exclusion orders that police officers, assisted by the navy, issued to boats in the vicinity of the Orient Explorer last week.

To find out more, and take action to support Elvis Teddy, Te Whanau a Apanui, and the Stop Deep Sea Oil campaign, read the rest of the Action Alert on our blog at

https://coalactionnetworkaotearoa.wordpress.com/2011/04/24/action-alert-from-pma-iwi-fishing-skipper-detained-on-navy-warship/

(with thanks to Peace Movement Aotearoa: http://www.converge.org.nz/pma/)

and be sure to check out the Stop Deep Sea Oil campaign site:

http://www.stopdeepseaoil.org.nz/

CAN Aotearoa Energy Strategy Release Embarrasses Government

The Government wasn’t quite ready to release its poor excuse for a New Zealand Energy Strategy, so we saved them the trouble by doing it for them. You can see the story, and the strategy, on our blog at

https://coalactionnetworkaotearoa.wordpress.com/2011/04/04/press-release-advance-copy-of-the-governments-new-zealand-energy-strategy/

Our release, and the Government’s subsequent reaction to both the release itself and the criticism it received over the document’s emphasis on mining and exploiting fossil fuels with regards for the climate change consequences, was widely covered. Here is a sampling of the stories:

And that’s Part 1 of the newsletter. Part 2 is coming soon!
Regards
Tim Jones
for the Coal Action Network Aotearoa

Coal Action Network Aotearoa (CAN Aotearoa) is a group of climate justice campaigners committed to fighting the continuation of coal mining in Aotearoa New Zealand.

CAN Aotearoa’s objectives are to:
1. Phase out coal mining and coal usage within 20 years, initially by opposing new and expanded coal mines.
2. Promote a cultural change so that mining and using coal are unacceptable.
3. Work towards a society where people and the environment are not exploited for profit.
4. Be part of a just transition to a coal-free Aotearoa New Zealand.

Or join the CAN Aotearoa supporters list by emailing: coalactionnetwork[at]gmail[dot]com

Report from Invercargill Public Meeting

CAN Aotearoa’s public meetings last week were a great success. Over 120 attended the Dunedin meeting on Wednesday 20th (the global day of action against extraction).

You can read Dave Kennedy’s write-up on the Invercargill meeting last Tuesday here: http://localbodies-bsprout.blogspot.com/2011/04/lignite-mining-what-price-for-future.html

And here is a report from the meeting’s co-host, Jenny Campbell of Forest and Bird:

The passion, knowledge of relevant facts and calm manner, all marks of speaker Jeanette Fitzsimons, came across strongly at the Invercargill meeting organised by Southland Forest and Bird along with CANA. Nearly 40 people including a strong contingent of press personnel – newspapers and local television- came to listen, interview and report. This produced some good coverage in Southland Times and Gore’s community newspaper Newslink, along with CUE TV local news. After Jeanette outlined her perspectives, backed up by statistics on a PowerPoint, people asked questions. These covered other concerns about employment, social effects, air pollution, water pollution, loss of habitat and farming land. People from local coal mining towns talked about the health issues they are facing now because of the dust containing elements such as aluminum and the effect on locals’ health, particularly children.
It was a very timely and worthwhile meeting with people being better informed, gaining some accurate statistics and information they can use when they are talking about this with others in their networks.Having a series of articles in the local newspapers along with letters to the Editor is proving very helpful as people realise it is not just an issue about jobs. After the formal meeting, informal chatting over coffee added another dimension as people were able to address their individual issues and concerns with Jeanette as well as network with others in order to support and encourage each other in what promises to be a long battle.

Action Alert from PMA: Iwi fishing skipper detained on navy warship

Kia ora koutou,

Here’s an opportunity to help out a campaign that CAN Aotearoa supports – with thanks to Peace Movement Aotearoa for the action alert, received yesterday.
Regards

Tim Jones

— original message from pma@xtra.co.nz —

Please forward on through your networks

Act now: Iwi fishing skipper detained on navy warship 23 April 2011

This action alert has four sections: what happened today, background information, what you can do, and where you can get more information. This message is available on-line at http://www.facebook.com/PeaceMovementAotearoa

What happened today

Elvis Teddy, skipper of the Te Whanau a Apanui tribal fishing boat San Pietro, was arrested at sea and detained on a navy warship while fishing in Te Whanau a Apanui ccustomary fishing grounds in the vicinity of the Orient Explorer, the deep sea oil survey ship ship currently conducting seismic testing in the Raukumara Basin on behalf of Brazilian oil company Petrobras. The arrest came the day after Maritime NZ withdrew the exclusion orders that police officers, assisted by the navy, issued to boats in the vicinity of the Orient Explorer last week.

This morning, Rikirangi Gage, CEO of Te Rununga o Te Whanau (Te Whanau a Apanui), radioed the Orient Explorer from the San Pietro as follows: “This is the San Pietro calling the Orient Explorer. You are not welcome in our waters. Accordingly and as an expression of our mana in these waters and our deep concern for the adverse effects of deep sea drilling, we will be positioning the Te Whanau a Apanui vessel directly in your path, approximately one and a half nautical miles in front of you. We will not be moving, we will be doing some fishing. We wish to reiterate that this is not a protest. We are defending tribal waters and our rights from reckless Government policies and the threat of deep sea drilling, which our hapu have not consented to and continue to oppose. We have a duty to uphold the mana of our hapu here in our territorial waters.” – the radio broadcast is available at http://www.facebook.com/video/video.php?v=216640131680960&oid=190815517606834

In response, two navy warships – HMNZS Taupo and HMNZS Hawea – sent inflatables with navy personnel and police officers to board the San Pietro and threatened to arrest all on board. Elvis Teddy was arrested, detained on one of the navy vessels, and taken to Tauranga while the others on board were left to crew the San Pietro.

Background information

On 1 June, the government awarded Brazilian oil company Petrobras a five-year exploration permit for oil and gas in the Raukumara Basin.

The first two stages of exploration involve seismic surveying – firing compressed air from the surface to the seabed, and measuring the acoustic waves bouncing back to the sonar array trailing 10 kilometres behind the Orient Express. Seismic surveying can have an adverse impact on marine life, especially marine mammals. The current surveying is taking place during the season of whale migration along the East Coast.

The permit includes permission for Petrobras to drill an exploratory well. The massive oil and gas spill in the Gulf of Mexico last year, which took three months to cap and spilled millions of barrels of oil into the ocean, was from an exploratory well at a depth of 1500 metres.

In the Raukumara Basin, the proposed depths for drilling an exploratory well range from 1500 to 3000 metres. The Raukumara Basin sits on a major and active fault line, and a simple search of geonet – http://www.geonet.org.nz – shows there are frequent earthquakes in the area. It is therefore particularly risky to place any sub-sea installation, such as an oil well, there.

Te Whanau a Apanui were not consulted about the exploration permit, nor did they give their consent for the seismic survey.

What you can do

Contact your local MP as soon as possible and express your concern about the exploration permit, the lack of consultation with Te Whanau a Apanui, the arrest of the skipper of a vessel exercising customary fishing rights, and the protection of the interests of a foreign oil company at the expense of the rights of the local iwi.

Contact details for all MPs are at http://www.parliament.nz/NR/rdonlyres/5858C8A5-ACDF-4B35-8D7A-3ABB7B19ACDB/190664/listofmembers130413.pdf

Where you can get more information

You can get more information on the No Drilling site at http://nodrilling.org.nz the Te Whanau a Apanui page at http://www.facebook.com/home.php?sk=group_190815517606834 and the Stop the Drilling on Our East Coast at http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=130406690316831

Some photos from the Te Whanau a Apanui protest in Wellington on 20 April are at http://www.facebook.com/media/set/fbx/?set=a.182818825098828.41171.116517195062325&l=c7c0026ef0

<> <> <> <> <> <> <> <> <> <> <> <> <> <> <> <><> <> Peace Movement Aotearoa the national networking peace organisation PO Box 9314, Wellington 6141, Aotearoa New Zealand Tel +64 4 382 8129, fax 382 8173 email pma@xtra.co.nz Website – http://www.converge.org.nz/pma Not in Our Name – http://www.converge.org.nz/pma/nionnz.htm <> <> <> <> <> <> <> <> >> war on terrorism? war is terrorism << <> <> <> <>

Article: 20 Theses against green capitalism

Disclaimer: This was not written by Coal Action Network Aotearoa, and it was written before Copenhagen.  However, we are reposting it because it’s worth a read.

No to false solutions! Climate Justice Now!

by Tadzio Mueller and Alexis Passadakis

1. The current world economic crisis marks the end of the neoliberalphase of capitalism.‘Business as usual’ (financialisation, deregulation, privatisation…) is thus no longer an option: new spaces of accumulation and types of political regulation will need to be found by governments and corporations to keep capitalism going.

2. Alongside the economic and political as well as energy crises, there is another crisis rocking the world: the biocrisis, the result of a suicidal mismatch between the ecological life support system that guarantees our collective human survival and capital’s need for constant growth.

3. This biocrisis is an immense danger to our collective survival, but like all crises it also presents us, social movements, with a historic opportunity: to really go for capitalism’s exposed jugular, its need for unceasing, destructive, insane growth.

4. Of the proposals that have emerged from global elites, the only one that promises to address all these crises is the ‘Green New Deal’. This is not the cuddly green capitalism 1.0 of organic agriculture and D.I.Y. windmills, but a proposal for a new ’green’ phase of capitalism that seeks to generate profits from the piecemeal ecological modernisation of certain key areas of production (cars, energy, etc.)

5. Green capitalism 2.0 cannot solve the biocrisis (climate change and other ecological problems such as the dangerous reduction of biodiversity), but rather tries to profit from it. It therefore does not fundamentally alter the collision course on which any market-driven economy sets humanity with the biosphere.

6. This isn’t the 1930s. Then, under the pressure of powerful social movements, the old ‘New Deal’ redistributed power and wealth downwards. The ‘New New’ and ‘Green New Deal’ discussed by Obama, green parties all around the world, and even some multinationals is more about welfare for corporations than for people.

7. Green Capitalism won’t challenge the power of those who actually produce most greenhouse gases: the energy companies, airlines and carmakers, industrial agriculture, but will simply shower them with more money to help maintain their profit rates by making small ecological changes that will be too little, too late.

8. Because globally, working people have lost their power to bargain and demand rights and decent wages, in a green capitalist setup, wages will probably stagnate or even decline to offset the rising costs of ‘ecological modernisation’.

9. The ‘green capitalist state’ will be an authoritarian one. Justified by the threat of ecological crisis it will ‘manage’ the social unrest that will necessarily grow from the impoverishment that lies in the wake of rising cost of living (food, energy, etc.) and falling wages.

10. In green capitalism, the poor will have to be excluded from consumption, pushed to the margins, while the wealthy will get to ‘offset’ their continued environmentally destructive behaviour, shopping and saving the planet at the same time.

11. An authoritarian state, massive class inequalities, welfare given to corporations: from the point of view of social and ecological emancipation, green capitalism will be a disaster that we can never recover from. Today, we have a chance to get beyond the suicidal madness of constant growth. Tomorrow, by the time we’ve all gotten used to the new green regime, that chance may be gone.

12. In green capitalism, there is a danger that established, mainstream environmental groups will come to play the role that trade unions played in the Fordist era: acting as safety valves to make sure that demands for social change, that our collective rage remain within the boundaries set by the needs of capital and governments.

13. Albert Einstein defined ‘insanity’ as “doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.” In the past decade, in spite of Kyoto, not only has the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere increased – so, too, has the rate of increase. Do we simply want more of the same? Wouldn’t that be insane?

14. International climate agreements promote false solutions that are often more about energy security than climate change. Far from solving the crisis, emissions trading, CMD, joint implementation, offsets and soon, all provide a political shield for the continued production of greenhouse gases with impunity.

15. For many communities in the global South, these false solutions (agrofuels, ‘green deserts’, CDM-projects) are by now often a greater threat than climate change itself.

16. Real solutions to the climate crisis won’t be dreamt up by governments or corporations. They can only emerge from below, from globally networked social movements for climate justice.

17. Such solutions include: no to free trade, no to privatisation, no to flexible mechanisms. Yes to food sovereignty, yes to degrowth, yes to radical democracy and to leaving the resources in the ground.

18. As an emerging global climate justice movement, we must fight two enemies: on one hand climate change and the fossilistic capitalism that causes it, and on the other, an emergent green capitalism that won’t stop it, but will limit our ability to do so.

19. Of course, climate change and free trade aren’t the same thing, but: the Copenhagen-protocol will be a central regulatory instance of green capitalism just as the WTO was central to neoliberal capitalism. So how to relate to it? The Danish group KlimaX argues: A good deal is better than no deal – but no deal is way better than a bad one.

20. The chance that governments will come up with a ‘good deal’ in Copenhagen is slim to none. Our aim must therefore be to demand agreement on real solutions. Failing that: to forget Kyoto, and shut down Copenhagen! (whatever the tactic)

By Tadzio Mueller and Alexis Passadakis (12/2008). Alexis is a member of attac Germany’s coordinating council, Tadzio a part of the Turbulence editorial collective (www.turbulence.org.uk). They are both active in the emerging climate justice movement, and can be reached at againstgreencapitalism (at) googlemail.com

Retrieved 15 April 2011 from http://climateactioncafe.wordpress.com/2008/12/05/20-theses-against-green-capitalism/

Global Day of Action Against Extraction

Press release: Advance copy of the Government’s New Zealand Energy Strategy

PRESS RELEASE: Coal Action Network Aotearoa
Sunday 3rd April
FOR IMMEDIATE USE

The Coal Action Network Aotearoa (CANA) is today releasing a draft of the Government’s replacement New Zealand Energy Strategy, which it obtained recently.

“One of the first things the current Government did when it came to power was to announce its intention to replace the previous Government’s New Zealand Energy Strategy, which made some moves towards favouring renewable energy systems over the burning of fossil fuels, and the associated New Zealand Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy,” said CANA spokesperson Frances Mountier.

“We have obtained what appears to be a very recent draft copy of the current Government’s New Zealand Energy Strategy – recent enough that is shows Hekia Parata rather than Gerry Brownlee as the responsible Minister. The previous Government’s detailed strategy has been watered down to a 40 page glossy booklet that we have decided to make available on our blog as of today:

https://coalactionnetworkaotearoa.files.wordpress.com/2011/04/nz-energy-strategy-nzeecs-v12-21-march-11-1.pdf

“This document clearly shows that the Government’s stated commitment to reducing New Zealand’s greenhouse gas emissions is a sham. Its top priority is stated as being to develop petroleum and mineral fuel resources ahead of other priorities like developing renewable energy resources, and embracing new energy technologies,” Ms Mountier explained. “This approach, which is demonstrated by the present Government’s enthusiasm for mining lignite and handing out deep water oil drilling permits regardless of the environmental consequences, is completely incompatible with reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and will instead lead to major increases in emissions.”

“This glossy brochure shows how little this Government cares about the environment and about climate change,” concluded Ms Mountier. “No amount of smiling faces or pretty graphics can make up for the ugly reality.”

ENDS

Media contact:

Frances Mountier
Coal Action Network Aotearoa spokesperson